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Posts for: May, 2020

By KO'OLAU EAR, NOSE AND THROAT
May 15, 2020
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Cholesteatoma  
CholesteatomaCholesteatoma is when this excess amount of earwax creates a skin cyst on the eardrum or eardrum retraction pocket.
 
The Causes Behind Cholesteatoma
 
Cholesteatoma develops for a few different reasons. The most common one is bad ventilation in the eustachian tube. This connects the middle ear to your throat, nose, and sinuses. It’s what controls the pressure behind your eardrum. When it fails to work correctly, it doesn’t drain the middle ear, retracting the eardrum and collecting earwax and skin cells. Allergies and colds can heighten your risk of developing cholesteatoma, as these can lead to eustachian tube dysfunction.
 
Symptoms of Cholesteatoma
 
Most of the time, patients don’t realize that what they are experiencing is a cholesteatoma. The condition is not painful unless an infection occurs. Patients should expect cholesteatoma if they experience these symptoms: 
  • Frequent earache
  • Dizziness
  • Recurring ear infections
  • Drainage of foul liquid from the ear, possibly bloody
  • Hearing loss
  • Ear feelings stuffy or full
If any of these sound familiar, let your ENT doctor know right away. 
 
Treating Cholesteatoma
 
The only way to treat cholesteatoma is by removing the cyst from the ear. This is accomplished through surgical intervention. The location of the cholesteatoma determines the type of surgery. The patient undergoes testing before anything is scheduled. An examination of the ear can reveal the cholesteatoma, but not to its full extent. The patient needs a CT scan to provide precise imaging of the ear anatomy. The ENT doctor will also perform an audiogram, known as a hearing test. This indicates how much damage the cholesteatoma has caused. 
 
Before surgery, follow any advice given by the ENT. The patient may receive medications that hinder the drainage, along with antibiotics to treat the infection. The procedure is typically performed in an outpatient facility. The surgery removes the skin and infection, along with reconstructing either the eardrum or hearing bones. 
 
If you think you may be dealing with cholesteatoma, it’s important that you schedule an appointment with your Ears, Nose, and Throat (ENT) doctor right away. 

By Ko'olau Ear, Nose and Throat
May 01, 2020
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Hearing Aids  
Hearing loss is a widespread problem that affects large groups of people. It isn’t just caused by age, with younger people and children also being affected. It comes on gradually, with your hearing getting worse and worse. At a certain point, you need to consider investing in hearing aids. Before you talk to your Ears, Nose, and Throat specialist, educate yourself on the common signs of hearing loss. 
 
Do I Have Hearing Loss?
 
In most cases, the people around you will notice your hearing loss before you do. This is because you’ll start needing the things around you to be louder. The TV may sound quiet to you, but to others, it might be unnecessarily loud. They might also notice that they need to speak louder for you to understand them. 
 
Here are a few other common signs of hearing loss: 
  • People seem to be talking very quietly all the time
  • You find it difficult to follow along in conversations
  • Higher pitched sounds, like alarm clocks or birds, are harder to hear
  • Words with higher frequency consonants like f, t, s, p, and h are difficult to distinguish
  • You frequently ask people to repeat themselves
If you are experiencing any of these, schedule an appointment with an ENT. A hearing test can get you started on the right path. After taking the test, your doctor can determine what is causing your hearing loss and recommend hearing aids. 
 
Should I Get A Hearing Aid?
 
Hearing aids take normal sound and amplify it so that you can hear it. You’ll notice a major improvement in your ability to understand and converse with other people. 
 
Depending on your hearing test results, you may require one or two hearing aids. Binaural hearing is the ability to hear out of both ears. Sound reaches your ears at different times, letting you locate where a noise is coming from. You need binaural hearing to live a successful life. If both ears are showing lower levels of hearing, your ENT may recommend two hearing aids. Even if one ear hears better than the other, using two hearing aids improves the quality for the more affected ear. 
 
Contact a Professional Ears, Nose, and Throat Specialist Today
 
If any of the above experiences sound familiar to you, contact your local Ears, Nose, and Throat (ENT) specialist today. They can help evaluate your hearing and find a solution that works for you.